ICT4agriculture

ICT4agriculture

Germany:

ALTERNATIVE SMALLHOLDER FARMING AND NONINDUSTRIAL TECHNIQUES

GermanyIn Germany, there is currently a growing movement of a variety of small groups of citizens who aim to organize local and regional food self sufficiency. Under the terms of Urban Gardening, Transition Town or Community-Supported Agriculture, people with and without an agricultural background gather to realize a “non-industrial and market-neutral” agriculture. In this form of alternative agriculture, the use of large scale machinery and industrial production processes is not wanted and often not financially feasible.

From this situation results a strong demand for alternative methods and techniques which are specially adapted to the needs of small structured forms of production and a corresponding high number of such technologies are developed and featured on a variety of websites and blogs and are published in social networks. However, a service is still missing, which would continuously validate, refine and evaluate the multitude of available small-scale technology innovations.

Creating awareness of alternatives

The aim of the German team is therefore the development of such a science-based and needs-focused online service for the evaluation and dissemination of technologies in the field of urban and alternative agriculture. The first activities in summer 2016 brought together a multi-disciplinary team including further experts from the fields of online pedagogics, open source collaborative product development, organic farming and community supported farming representing academic institutions, NGOs and private sector. Their motivation and interest in the topic is in general high, although it still remains to be seen, which type of projects can be realized in which constellations.

The country unit in Germany has not yet formulated a concrete idea, but has the general ambition of developing some sort of service to meet technology demands of local small scale organic farmers, as the needs assessment is still necessary for getting a clear picture of the target groups’ actual needs and preferred formats of communication. Discussed until now were potential directions ranging from an eLearning course platform for self-learning of topics related to appropriate technology and methods for small-scale organic farming to an information database, providing a structured and usage context based overview of available technologies, on to tools supporting the collaborative development and adaption of new technologies for farming.

Different formats of crowd-sourced or expert gremial based evaluation and recommendation of appropriate technologies were discussed and, in addition to the actual needs assessment among the farming communities, a thorough evaluation of descriptions of technologies currently available online will be of essence to the process of narrowing options and developing the actual project idea.

To find out more about the projects, click on the flags below.

Ethiopia ICT4agriculture Ethiopia

ICT Entrepreneurship and the Honey Value Chain in Ethiopia
The Ethiopian Innovation Factory team has examined indepth all stages of the honey production value chain and their related stakeholders with the intent of identifying potentially fruitful challenges of technology-based interventions. The team intends to both support the further development of existing apicultural techniques and traditions, but also to involve the private sector in bolstering of the honey value chain by developing a new ecosystem for entrepreneurship and innovation around the value chain in order to facilitate the sustainable development of context appropriate ICT solutions for the Ethiopian honey production sector.... Read more...

Germany ICT4agriculture Germany

Low-tech for community supported agriculture in Germany
The German country unit of the Innovation Factory programme has chosen to focus on the growing movement of a variety of small groups of citizens who aim to organize local and regional food self sufficiency. Under the terms of Urban Gardening, Transition Town or Community-Supported Agriculture, people with and without an agricultural background gather to realize a “non-industrial and marketneutral” agriculture. In this form of alternative agriculture, the use of large-scale machinery and industrial production processes is not wanted and often not financially feasible.... Read more...

Indonesia ICT4agriculture Indonesia

Indigenous Culture and Rural Techies in Indonesia
While the recent large-scale introduction of new affordable and accessible ICT hardware and software solutions to most economic sectors across the globe promise benefits of prospering economies and rapid societal development, they also carry with them a great risk of destroying prevailing cultural and social structures and thereby pose athreat especially to the continued existence of vulnerable indigenous cultures and traditional rural communities in developing countries. What have made ICTs especially prevalent and interesting recently are their dramatically increased afffordability, accessibility, and adaptability, most notably considering the boom of mobile communication devices and networks. ... Read more...

Senegal ICT4agriculture Senegal

Youth, ICT & Agribusiness in Senegal
Although agriculture is commonly predicted to remain the dominant sector to sustain economic growth in Africa for the coming decades, offering a vast array of business opportunities and sources of income for local youth, large amounts of young Africans still chose to leave their families’ rural farms in search for uncertain success in the city. On the other hand, young urban professionals from the IT- and related tech-sectors have still not been sensitized to the great need of technological innovations in agriculture and food-production. To bridge these awareness and knowledge gaps, a community of young people in the Senegalese town of Thiès had the idea to establish an agricultural technology innovation hub named “Yesaal Agrihub” as a focal point for IT-based technological innovation within the Senegalese agribusiness scene. Read more...

Effects

  • Key persons are ready to engage in the innovation factory
  • Competences in project planning and implementation are improved
  • Learn from one another
  • Organisational, financial and human resource requirements are available
  • Self organisation
  • Joint project planning